Chinese(Simplified)Chinese(Traditional)CzechDanishDutchEnglishFrenchGermanHebrewHindiItalianJapaneseKoreanPortugueseRussianSpanish

Madinat Habu Temple

Print Friendly

The Temple of Rameses III

Madinat Habu Temple

Madinat Habu Temple

In ancient times Madinat Habu was known as Djanet and according to ancient belief was the place were Amun first appeared. Both Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III built a temple dedicated to Amun here and Later Rameses III constructed his larger memorial temple on the site.

 

First Pylon – the temple of Rameses IIIDuring his time Djanet became the administrative centre of Western Thebes. The whole temple complex was surrounded by a massive fortified enclosure wall, with an unusual gateway at the eastern entrance, known as the pavilion gate. This structure, a copy of a Syrian migdol fortresses is something you would no expect to see in Egypt. Rameses III, a military man probably saw the virtue in such a structure. It is likely Rameses resided here from time to time because a royal palace was attached at the south of the open forecourt of this temple, while priests’ dwellings and administrative buildings lay on either side of the temple. Originally a canal with a harbour outside the entrance, connected the temple to the Nile. But this was obliterated by the desert long ago.

Madinat Habu temple from the air

Madinat Habu temple from the air

In later times, because of its strong fortifications, it was the place of refuge during the civil war between the High Priest of Amun at Karnak and the viceroy of Kush. In the period of the Twenty Fifth and Twenty Sixth Dynasties (700 BC) the wives of Amon were worshipped in the Chapels called the Divine Adoratrices of Amun. During the Greek and Roman periods the site was expanded and between the 1st and 9th centuries AD a Coptic city was built and the temple was used as a Christen church.

The exterior walls are carved with religious scenes and portrayals of Rameses III’s wars against the Libyans and the Sea Peoples. The first pylon depicts the king smiting his enemies and also has a list of conquered lands. The interior walls also have a wealth of well preserved bas-reliefs some of which still retain their original paint work.

Some of the original paint work can still be seen at temple. I‘ve studied Madinat Habu as a guide for many of my temple reconstructions.

Some of the original paint work can still be seen at temple. I‘ve studied Madinat Habu as a guide for many of my temple reconstructions.



The mystery of Egyptian cult temples explained, illustrated with videos, photos, drawings and 30 highly detailed computer generated reconstructions. Also for Windows and MAC >>


AD-Karnak---GreatCourt

You may use the material on this site for Educational, non-profit purposes provided I’m credited with a link back to this site. To use the materials on this site please eMail me and ask permission. All Text & artwork is © Mark Millmore. Discovering Egypt Website Established 1997